Depression

20150219_081740

Top Twelve Posts from November, 2014 to February, 2015

“May all beings have happiness…” | Buddhist Quote
An Ounce of Home Mini Buddhist Altar Travel Kit
Dream of a Tsunami and a Tornado | Interpretation?
13 Self-Reflection Tasks for a Viktor Frankl and Logotherapy Workshop #Longreads
Sloughed Off | How I Grew a New Skin Such a Magical Thing
Happy New Year 2015 | Mindfulness Project Free Resources for You
“I Go to Seek a Great Perhaps” – Attributed to François Rabelais
The Normal | The Fallacy of Normalcy | No Wish to be Normal
About
Depression and Hope – The Danny Baker Story
Belongings in the Sand
The Unfurling of my Heart | A Young Woman’s Journey with Ayahuasca in Peru and the Amazon

Image taken by Carol Knox on #FishHoek Beach, in #CapeTown South Africa.

I Had a Black Dog, His Name was Depression | WHO Video Message of Hope

In collaboration with the World Health Organisation (WHO) to mark World Mental Health Day, writer and illustrator Matthew Johnstone tells the story of overcoming the “black dog of depression”. More information on the book can be found here: Matthew Johnstone 

WHO Mental Health Topics

Feeling Down? Focus on Something you can Do, a Project or a Task that you can Accomplish

20150104_191103

When feeling down, depressed or blue, something that characterizes these feelings, is that nothing seems meaningful, life seems colourless and bleak. According to Viktor Frankl, one way to get out of this mind set, or to change these feelings, is to focus on creative things that you can do, uncovering meaning through tasks that you can fulfill. By thinking of a project or task that you can accomplish, you orient yourself towards the future and have something to look forward to doing. If you happen to be feeling down or depressed, try to think of something that you can do, no matter how small. Then throw yourself into action to do it.

Photo by Carol Knox of the valley taken from Trappieskop, Kalk Bay, Cape Town.

Shaking Up and Giving Up | A New Life

20141116_090131

Having encountered Dr Viktor Frankl in studying the Introductory course in Logotherapy at the University of South Africa, (UNISA), in  2012 and meeting Dr Teria Shantall at the workshop, I discovered my own vehicle to unfolding my meaning. At the time I was not sure how this would unfold. I really wanted to become a Logotherapist, but was not in the financial position to continue with the other courses offered at UNISA. In the time since then I have been in the process of paring down, which began with the letting out of my home. I moved in with my sister and then into a tiny “cupboard” as I put my house on the market, sold it and waited for my funds to come through. During this time of waiting and paring down, I worked on a fictional short story: Belongings in the Sand: The Tale of the Red Heeled Shoes, and a small How to Guide on How to Reduce Stress, which I learnt how to publish as an ebook through BookBaby, which is nearing completion and due for submission to BookBaby for distribution.

As I struggled with the confines of the small space and many disruptions and lack of peace and quiet while living in my “cupboard”, I came to the idea to do a PHD to work with sufferers of trauma and PTSD. The underlying inspiration for this came from my relationship with Brett Pelser, who suffered so from depression and what I feel was PTSD. Finally and tragically he committed suicide. The idea also is deeply inspired by Logotherapy and Viktor Frankl. I really feel that trauma sufferers experience an existential crisis, their world no longer makes sense, they have no language to speak this senselessness, this schism in their very being and at the heart of their lives. My journey has taken me across the country to the Western Cape, which has the highest trauma statistics in the country. I have been accepted to do this PHD through UNISA and the Psychology Department. Things are uncertain for me in terms of creating an income to support myself and this study. I am staying in the moment, being positive and looking forward to new opportunities. A new life, a revealing and unfolding, the time is now.

Image of the beach five minutes from my new space. Courtesy Carol Knox.

Depression and Hope – The Danny Baker Story

Today I read a post on the Good Men Project responding to condolences and queries around depression and the very sad news about the passing of the wonderful Robin Williams. Do go along and read it here.

17

They also offer a free copy of the Danny Baker story here.

‘Recounting my struggle and eventual triumph over depression, I wrote it so that sufferers of the illness could realise they are not alone – that there are other people out there who have gone through the same excruciating misery, and who have made it through to the other side. I also wrote it so that I could impart the lessons I learned on the long, rocky, winding road that eventually led to recovery – so that people could learn from my mistakes as well as my victories – particularly with regards to relationships; substance abuse; choosing a fulfilling career path; seeking professional help; and perhaps most importantly, having a healthy and positive attitude towards depression that enables recovery. Multiple-bestselling author Nick Bleszynski has described it as “beautifully written, powerful, heartfelt, insightful and inspiring … a testament to hope.”’ 

Sign up for inspirational quotes by Danny Baker here – you are not alone.

See a previous post of mine about personal experience of a friend’s suicide and the story of Brad Warner.